::Marlene Dietrich Internet Museum
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::1934 - The Devil is a Woman / Die spanische Tänzerin



USA 1935
Paramount
black & white

Synopsis:
During carnival week in the south of Spain, Antonio Galvan, expatriate of Spain, sees Concha Perez and becomes infatuated with her. He then meets his old friend Don Pasqual, who relates the story of how Concha ruined him: Pasqual rescued Concha from work in a cigarette factory, gave her enough money to live on and proposed marriage to her, but she disappeared after sending him a letter saying she never wanted to see him again. Three months later, Concha came to ask him for money and professed her love for him, but after receiving the money she refused his second proposal. Six months later, he ran into her at a nightclub where she was the lead singer. He still loved her, although she was consorting with a young bullfighter. After one show, Pasqual broke into her room and beat her upon discovering her with the bullfighter. Later, he bought Concha's contract from the nightclub owner, and Concha rode off with the bullfighter as Pasqual watched from the balcony. Because of their association with Concha, Pasqual lost his military commission and the bullfighter committed suicide. Pasqual makes Antonio swear that he will not see Concha, but Antonio has coffee with her, breaking his promise so he can exact revenge for his friend. Antonio falls in love with her, though, and when Pasqual breaks in, he challenges Antonio to a duel. The next morning they meet and Antonio shoots Pasqual, then the police arrest him. Concha uses her feminine wiles to win his release and two passports, but as she and Antonio cross the border together and are about to board a train for Paris, she changes her mind and takes the return train to be with Pasqual, breaking Antonio's heart.

Cast:
Marlene Dietrich (Concha Perez)
Lionel Atwill (Capt. Don Pasqual 'Pasqualito' Costelar)
Edward Everett Horton (Gov. Don Paquito 'Paquitito')
Alison Skipworth (Senora Perez)
Cesar Romero (Antonio Galvan)
Don Alvarado (Morenito)
Tempe Pigott (Tuerta)
Francisco Moreno (Alphonso)
Hank Mann (Foreman on Snowbound Train – scenes deleted)
Max Barwyn (Pablo)
Eddie Borden (Reveler with Balloon)
Jill Dennett (Maria)
Luisa Espinel (Gypsy Dancer)
John George (Street Beggar)
Lawrence Grant (Duel Conductor)
Edwin Maxwell (Tobacco Plant Manager)
Stanley Price (Hospital Clerk)
Donald Reed (Cousin' Miguelito)
Henry Roquemore (Duel Informant)
Charles Sellon (Letter Writer)
Morgan Wallace (Dr. Mendez)

Crew:
Josef von Sternberg (director)
John Dos Passos (adaptation)
Sam Winston (continuity)
David Hertz (contributor to treatment)
Oran Schee (contributor to screenplay construction)
Josef von Sternberg (producer)
Emanuel Cohen (executive producer)
John Leipold (original music)
Heinz Roemheld (original music)
Josef von Sternberg (cinematography)
Lucien Ballard (cinematography)
Sam Winston (film editing)
Fred A. Datig (casting)
Hans Dreier (art direction)
Josef von Sternberg (art direction)
Richard Harlan (assistant director)
Neil Wheeler (second assistant director)
Arthur Camp (props)
A.E. Freudeman (set dresser)
Harry D. Mills (sound)
James V. King (assistant camera)
Stanley Williams (chief electrician)
Travis Banton (costumes: Miss Dietrich)
Henry West (wardrobe)
Herman Hand (composer: additional music)
Max Rabinowitz (music arranger)
Andrea Setaro (musical director)
Adolph Zukor (presenter)
Gaston Duval (researcher)
Evelyn Earle (script clerk)
Eric Locke (business manager)
John Miles (publicist)
Rudolf Sieber (assistant: Josef von Sternberg)
Anita Wilson (stand-in: Marlene Dietrich)
based on the novel "La femme et le pantin" ("The Woman and the Puppet") by Pierre Louÿs

Music:
«Caprice Espagnol» by Rimski-Korsakow, arranged by Ralph Rainger
additional Music by Andrea Setaro

Songs:
«(If It Isn’t Pain) Then It Isn’t Love», «Three Sweethearts Have I» by Ralph Rainger (Music) and Leo Robin (Lyrics)

Length:
2.162 Meter 77 Minutes

Production:
15 October 1934 - January 1935

Premiere:
3 May 1935, Paramount Theatre, New York